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Sony DSC-F1

Sony DSC-F1 (three quarters)

Sony DSC-F1 (three quarters)

Sony DSC-F1 (three quarters)

Sony DSC-F1 (three quarters)

Sony DSC-F1 (front view)

Sony DSC-F1 (front view)

Sony DSC-F1 (front view, lens rotated 90°)

Sony DSC-F1 (front view, lens rotated 90°)

Sony DSC-F1 (rear view, lens rotated 90°)

Sony DSC-F1 (rear view, lens rotated 90°)

Sony DSC-F1 (top view)

Sony DSC-F1 (top view)

Sony DSC-F1 (with 35mm cassette for scale)

Sony DSC-F1 (with 35mm cassette for scale)

Sony DSC-F1 (three quarters)Sony DSC-F1 (three quarters)Sony DSC-F1 (front view)Sony DSC-F1 (front view, lens rotated 90°)Sony DSC-F1 (rear view, lens rotated 90°)Sony DSC-F1 (top view)Sony DSC-F1 (with 35mm cassette for scale)

Manufacturer: Sony Corporation

Made in: Japan

Introduced: 1996

Camera Type: Live Preview

Format: Digital (internal memory)

Dimensions (cm): 10.8 x 7.8 x 4.5
10.8 x 8.8 x 3.8 (lens rotated 90°)

The Sony DSC-F1 is the very first model released under Sony’s “Cyber-shot” line of consumer digital cameras and also the first of their high-end F series which all feature rotatable lenses. The F1 wowed the masses when it was announced, being named one of Business Week magazine’s “Top New Products” and receiving the “Innovations Award” at the annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas.

The DSC-F1 features what was then considered state of the art technology with a 1/3″ CCD sensor capable of producing VGA quality images (640×480 pixels). Coupled to the 0.3 megapixel sensor is a 4.8mm (35mm equivalent) f/2.0 lens that can rotate up to 180 degrees for self-portraits or shooting from the hip. The electronic shutter is capable of speeds ranging from 1/30 to 1/1000 seconds and once taken, images are stored in the camera’s 4MB of internal memory which can then be retrieved by connecting the camera to a computer. Amazingly, The DSC-F1 also has an infrared transceiver which allows it to beam images directly to Sony’s DPP-M55 digital color printer.

Of course, all of this sleekly packaged technology comes at a price which, in this case, was a staggering $849 (about $1,250 today). Luckily for me, I didn’t pay anything even close to that; in fact, I didn’t pay anything for it at all. I actually found this camera online through an ad posted by the daughter of an elderly woman who wanted to give it away to someone who would give it a good home. With the F1 being the genesis of Sony’s long-lived and storied Cyber-shot line, I jumped at the chance.